Goldendoodle Puppy by Adorable Doodles

Training Goldendoodles and Bernedoodles

We've compiled our Top 10 Doodle Training Tips that we think you should follow. Learn how to avoid common errors, and keep your four-legged pal happy, healthy and well-behaved!

  1. Buy Your Pet from a Responsible Breeder

    Why this is important

    That doggie in the window may be darling, but he might not be the right fit for your family or lifestyle.

    Training Tip

    Fully inform yourself before you bring home a pet. Every dog or cat has its own needs, some of which are specific to the breed. If there's a breed that interests you, read up on it, talk to owners, and get to know someone else's Goldendoodle. Ask about the pet's history, health, and temperament. When dealing with a breeder, you should be shown where the pet was raised and meet its parents if the breeder owns both parents.
  2. Take an Obedience Training Class

    Why this is important

    Bad habits can be difficult to train out of a pet. So unless you have the know-how to school an animal, you need the help of a professional before the bad habits are established.

    Training Tip

    Even before a puppy starts formal training, teach it simple commands, such as sit and stay. A puppy can begin formal training at eight weeks (and ideally before 12 weeks) after it's had its shots. Between the ages of 8 and 16 weeks, puppies readily absorb information about the world around them. To help a puppy stick with good behaviors, every few years take it for a refresher training course.
  3. Be Consistent With the Rules

    Why this is important

    If one child lets the puppy on the bed and another punishes it for being on the bed, the animal will be confused. Bad behavior is inevitable.

    Training Tip

    Make sure everyone in your household knows and follows the same training techniques. You want your puppy to sit before eating a treat? You don't want your puppy to jump up and knock someone down? Then figure out a system that will help your pet succeed. Pets thrive with a sense of order, so discuss with your family when yours should be fed, exercised, and even given a treat.
  4. Dispense Free Treats Sparingly

    Why this is important

    Treats lose their training value if your pet gets them for no reason.

    Training Tip

    Think of treats as currency given to a pet to reward good behavior. Assign each type of treat a value, and pay according to how well your pet behaves. Kibble is worth a dollar; a chicken strip, five; bologna, 10. But it's important to not pay off the good behavior all the time. That way, your dog will always hope he might get that piece of bologna, and he'll eventually perform without seeing a treat.
  5. Socialize Your Pet

    Why this is important

    Pets that aren't exposed to a variety of animals and people at a very young age can develop fears and aggressive behavior.

    Training Tip

    Introduce your pet to adults, kids, animals, and environments so he'll take every novelty in stride. It's optimal for a pet to start the process before you bring him home, since the critical socialization period is early in life. For a puppy, it's between the ages of 3 and 12 weeks. For cats, it's between 2 and 8 weeks, The breeder can tell you how much socialization an animal has had.
  6. Give Your Pet Plenty of Exercise

    Why this is important

    Pets have pent-up energy that needs to be unleashed through physical activity. Otherwise it will be channeled into barking, jumping, or even hostile behavior.

    Training Tip

    Walk your dog at least twice a day for a minimum of 30 minutes each time. To your dog, that's a primal activity. Birds fly, fish swim, and dogs walk. It's recommended that dogs get at least 40 minutes of aerobic exercise daily. Dogs need more exercise than people do Try running or biking with your dog or playing fetch or Frisbee. If you can't take your dog jogging before and after work, give your dog 10 to 20 minutes of playtime per day.
  7. Keep Your Pet Mentally Active

    Why this is important

    Bored pets are more likely to get into trouble.

    Training Tip

    Give your pets something to do. For a dog, that can mean having him hunt for food. Place a meal or treats in spots around the house for him to sniff out, or feed him out of a food-dispensing puzzle toy instead of his bowl. Keep your puppy engaged with simple amusements, like a toy dangling from a string. You can stimulate your dog in many ways.
  8. Don't Leave your Pet Alone for Too Long

    Why this is important

    A lack of proper companionship can lead to separation anxiety and destructive behaviors.

    Training Tip

    It is not recommended to leave a puppy alone for eight hours. Hire someone to watch him or drop him off at a doggie day-care center. Your puppy will need to learn how to be alone for a few hours each day. Put him in a crate (or leash him to a stable object) a foot or two away from you. then gradually increase the distance over the course of a week. Then make sure that he spends escalating amounts of time alone in his crate or confined to a room. Break up the day for dogs of any age with a visit from a dog walker or a neighbor, and give your pet access to toys and visual stimulations.
  9. Make Your Home Pet-Friendly

    Why this is important

    A dog without a cozy bed will end up on the couch.

    Training Tip

    Dogs are far less persnickety about where they relieve themselves, but do them the favor of regularly picking up the poop in the backyard. Dogs also need spots where they can cuddle up and feel safe. A dog needs a crate like a teenager needs a room. Provide a crate or a cozy bed, and make it taboo for your family to pester the dog while he's in it.
  10. Punish Your Pet Effectively

    Why this is important

    You might think your puppy knows you're screaming at him because he ate the loaf of bread on the counter, but he won't connect your behavior with his action.

    Training Tip

    Never physically punish your pet; he'll just learn to fear you. It's OK to startle a pet out of a behavior, but only if you catch him in the act. Command him with a firm "No!" or "Down!" and he'll connect the reaction with what he's doing and learn that it's not OK. Otherwise, the punishment should come from the environment. Teach a cat or a dog to stay off the counter, say, by arranging sheet pans in a pile that will clatter to the floor if he jumps up. The counter, not you, will become the thing to fear.